Steve Jobs, R.I.P.

The Wall Street Journal collected a number of Mr. Jobs's sayings over the last quarter of a century. Here are his thoughts in 1985 about the future role of the Internet:
The most compelling reason for most people to buy a computer for the home will be to link it to a nationwide communications network. We’re just in the beginning stages of what will be a truly remarkable breakthrough for most people––as remarkable as the telephone. [Playboy, Feb. 1, 1985]
Eleven years later, on the optimism that leads people to suspect a conspiracy:
When you’re young, you look at television and think, There’s a conspiracy. The networks have conspired to dumb us down. But when you get a little older, you realize that’s not true. The networks are in business to give people exactly what they want. That’s a far more depressing thought. Conspiracy is optimistic! You can shoot the bastards! We can have a revolution! But the networks are really in business to give people what they want. It’s the truth. [Wired, February 1996]
Six years ago, on death:
Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure — these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart. [Stanford commencement speech, June 2005]

You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.

2 comments:

Eric said...

Thanks for posting that.

rcl said...

Mark Levin announced Steve's passing on my way home from work. I looked up the Macintosh Intro video when I got home. I remember how stunning this demo was back in 1984. I feel such joy for him when I see it.

I owe my job to Steve in a way. I bought one of the first 512s and ran my millwork business with it. I was an Excel expert before Windows even existed. When W3.1 came out I was better at Windows and MS Office than any of the old PC hands because I'd been using Macs for years. So after 20 years in the field I traded in my 16 ibuprofen per day habit for a desk job.

Thanks Steve. You are one of a kind.